Keys To Network-Caliber Sports Talk

Great sports talk sounds spontaneous. Folks like Jim Rome, Dan Patrick and Colin Cowherd make it sound easy. It’s not easy. What sounds spontaneous and effortless is actually the result of many hours of preparation.

This multi-media presentation will show you the techniques and strategies you can use in your own show to build it into a network-caliber, ratings and revenue generating machine.

Group Critique 42: July 2020

This month’s Group Critique features football, basketball and baseball play-by-play.

The audio episode features a focus on how to use your voice as an instrument. It is the number one technique that separates good play-by-play broadcasters from great ones, yet the most difficult to master.

You’ll also hear . . .

  • A common football habit that indicates lack of preparation
  • An example of the line between partiality to your team and homerism
  • An editing technique to make calling a game from TV sound more plausibly live
  • Examples of showing personality in a TV broadcast

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Group Critique 41: June 2020

We hit for the cycle in the audio program — football, basketball, baseball and hockey play-by-play. The video features sports anchoring and reporting, interviewing and baseball play-by-play.

Among the nuggets . . .

  • Subtle examples of using your voice as an instrument
  • A common mistake among basketball broadcasters
  • How over-using first and last names can hurt your broadcast
  • The advantage of sounding conversational versus polished
  • Examples of great script writing
  • Tips on effective structure for questions
  • How to emphasize the subtle but important storylines in your play-by-play

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Group Critique 40: May 2020

We have a wide range of audio and video samples this month. Included are football, basketball, baseball, softball, hockey and radio news/sports anchoring.

Here’s what you’ll learn:

  • The additional piece of info you should always give with time and score
  • A common mistake to avoid when giving the score
  • An important difference in the ways that headline news and sports news scripts should be delivered
  • A simple technique to add drama to your play-by-play voice
  • Good examples of 4th Gear play-by-play
  • Instructions you should give your analyst before broadcasting a no-huddle football team
  • Examples of showing your personality in your play-by-play

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Group Critique 39: April 2020

We have audio and video this month featuring basketball, baseball and hockey play-by-play.

Here’s what you’ll learn:

  • Key info to include with time and score
  • Why fair and foul balls should be treated equally
  • Great examples of character development in a hockey broadcast
  • Why you give time and score immediately after a made basket
  • Two tips for maximizing the resonance of your voice
  • How to use your personality to set your broadcasts apart
  • How to vary your pacing
  • How to underscore key moments in a basketball game
  • Advice for setting up your analyst for success

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Member Hangout – March 23

Having limited access to people is quickly becoming not-so-great. We’re hosting a regular STAA members hang out to share stories, vent, ask questions, (hopefully) get answers, receive motivation and hopefully a few laughs.

If you weren’t able to join us live, you can check out the archive here!

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Group Critique 38: March 2020

The audio critiques this month include sports talk, basketball and hockey.

Here’s what you’ll learn:

  • A good example of a sports talk host presenting, then supporting his opinion.
  • The valuable sports talk techniques of storytelling and making topics relatable.
  • Score context and why to include it in your play-by-play.
  • When play-by-play broadcasters should NOT use great energy.
  • Why sending only play-by-play highlights to an employer will not get you hired.
  • Best practices for a TV basketball play-by-play demo.
  • The easy fix when you’re told your delivery needs more energy.
  • An acting technique that TV sportscasters should also employ.

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Group Critique 37: February 2020

The audio features basketball, football and softball.

Here’s what you’ll learn:

  • How to help a nasally voice and bring out your bass
  • A common mistake that will cause you to fall behind in your play-by-play call
  • When to ignore the shot clock and when referring to it becomes mandatory
  • How to add texture to your delivery and why it’s important
  • How to find your third gear for play-by-play
  • A common phrase used in radio that should not be used on TV
  • Examples of why it’s important to keep your comments brief
  • Advice for when you are broadcasting without an analyst

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Group Critique 36: January 2020

The audio program features football, basketball and sports talk. The video includes basketball play-by-play and TV reporting.

Among the nuggets . . .

  • A common word you should exclude from your play-by-play vocabulary
  • A powerful technique for giving time and score
  • How planning sports talk is like planning vacation
  • Two words to never say consecutively when calling basketball
  • How to make your listener care about your broadcast
  • Suggestions for using b-roll in a package
  • A play-by-play technique that is great late in games, but not early-on
  • How to use energy and inflection to supercharge your words

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Group Critique 35: December 2019

The last Group Critique of 2019 is here! The audio features football, basketball and baseball play-by-play. The video segment includes baseball and basketball.

Here’s what you’ll learn:

  • When it’s acceptable to give the score deficit instead of the numeric score.
  • Advice for doing live reads.
  • When statistics enhance, not hurt, your broadcast.
  • A suggestion for working a clever line into a broadcast.
  • Suggestions for keeping tabs on base-runners.
  • How talking less heightens drama.
  • How to use words to compliment the time and score graphic.

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